Search

Could my skin issues be caused by a leaky gut?

Do you have a leaky gut or leaky skin? Because our gut health affects our brain health and vice versa, it's not unthinkable that our gut could affect other organs such as the skin.


What is a leaky gut?


The gut is one of the body's most important disease-fighting systems.

Our bellies are lined with more than 4,000 square feet of the intestinal lining. When it works properly, it forms a tight barrier to restrict what enters the bloodstream. There may be large cracks or holes in an unhealthy gut lining, allowing partially digested food, toxins, and bacteria to penetrate. This is similar to the skin, which acts as a barrier that prevents foreign particles from entering the body. It is unclear what causes a leaky gut, but we all have some degree of it since this barrier is not completely impenetrable.

The symptoms may vary from person to person, and some people may have a combination of symptoms, including Stomach pain, especially after eating, as undigested particles breach the tight junction and enter the bloodstream, triggering an immune response. Diarrhea, constipation, gas or bloating, inflammatory bowel disease. It is believed that allergies are one of the most common leaky gut symptoms, along with nutrient deficiency, a weak immune system, and falling ill frequently. 

As a result of these triggers, inflammation develops and, in many cases, changes in gut flora (friendly microbes) develop that can lead to skin problems such as rashes, acne, and eczema.

Recent studies have shown that leaky guts and leaky skin are closely linked to eczema and psoriasis.  In a study involving 26 children with eczema, 14 of them were found to have leaky guts and eczema. Researchers said leaky gut was likely caused by food intolerances, so many participants went on elimination diets.  

An irritated and inflamed gut causes several problems. In response, the gut sends signals to tell the body to prepare for battle. As a result, the body ramps up the stress response in order to prepare for battle, and if the immune system isn't supercharged, no good fight will happen.

Gut microbiomes describe the balance of bacteria in the gut. A healthy gut contains healthy flora that prevents inflammation. The microbiome can directly affect the skin's health if it is out of balance. An imbalanced microbiome can be caused by a number of factors, such as bacterial or parasitic infection, bacterial overgrowth, or food sensitivities. Inflammation and toxicity can also manifest at the body's surface,like the gut walls. A leaky gut is known to create autoimmune responses that may result in breakouts and rashes on the surface of the skin.

According to the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation, similar findings have been found in those with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); 15 to 20% of people with ulcerative colitis and up to 25 to 30% of those with Crohn’s will also have skin conditions. It was demonstrated in a 2012 study that a drug used to treat the skin disease psoriasis reduced disease activity in the patients, i.e. improved their condition.


What is Leaky Skin


We've been aware of leaky guts for a long time, but what about leaky skin? People with leaky guts often have leaky skin. A damaged skin barrier impairs the skin's ability to function normally. Stress and chronic inflammation are likely to compromise our skin's ability to protect us. Skin infections can occur and worsen with weakening defenses, as the skin produces less of the naturally occurring anti-bacterial proteins that it normally makes. Further weakening of defenses will aggravate skin inflammation.


It is very critical to keep the skin well moisturised. Itchy skin results from dry skin. Whenever one scratches their skin, they damage the skin's barrier, allowing toxins and foreign particles to enter their bodies. It is recommended that you use a moisturiser that contains Shea Butter and is non-toxic, such as our Whipped Skin & Hair Food.


Gut healing foods are often the key to better skin health.


 




5 views0 comments